Tag Archive: Castle Combe


The Cotswolds


Always in my mind. Always in my list. Been to Stratford-upon-Avon on its north side, and south of it, Bath, but never stepped into the real Cotswolds territory. Until now. Time well spent in the English Countryside. In some places, time stood still. The honey-coloured stone cottages, the centuries-old market halls, “wool churches” and biscuit-hued houses with dry stone wall fences. So lovely!

Castle Combe

Malmesbury

Corsham

Bourton-on-the-Water

Arlington Row in Bibury

Stow-on-the-Wold

Tetbury and Cirencester

And finally, Chippenham, where the wedding was held. The reason why we’re here. The Lost Orangery in Euridge Manor was the perfect venue for such a fairytale wedding.

Chippenham


Rolling hills and quaint, lovely, charming villages. The Cotswolds is England’s largest “Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty” and it’s best to visit in the early morning before the tourist crowd. It’s understandable that the area packs a crowd but there are pockets of quintessential towns that offer peace, quiet and tranquility. On this morning, we chose to join a private tour — just 13 of us in a van including 2 who decided to be dropped off to stay longer in Cotswolds.

Cotswolds

Cotswolds

Castle Combe literally means “castle in the valley”. There was a real castle before it fell in ruins and the area redeveloped to house The Manor House, a posh hotel that guarantees quiet elegance and beauty. One enters the village through that section called “By the Brook”, which it is, until you reach an intersection where the Market Cross is. At the time we visited, we hardly saw any of the 500 residents. They must still be either asleep or lingering over their breakfasts inside the honey coloured stone houses typical in Cotswolds.

Cotswolds

Cotswolds

If you’re visiting Bath and has limited time to visit Cotswolds, try nearby Castle Combe. It only took like 20 minutes to get here and the honey-hued weavers’ cottages with split stone tile roofing are truly picturesque. I won’t recommend driving a car because parking here can be a problem especially during the tourist season, unless of course you really love driving. But it won’t cost much to hail a cab to bring you here then back, especially if there’s 4-5 of you to split the cab fare. You only need an hour, maybe even less to walk “by the brook”, check out St. Andrew’s Church and nearby cemetery and you can head back soon after. That’s if you have very limited time. Of course, you can always book a room at the ivy-covered The Manor House for at least a night 😊 And while there, how about splurging on dinner in their Michelin-starred restaurant?

Cotswolds

Cotswolds

No new houses have been built here since the 1600’s. And I doubt the residents here have opted to move elsewhere. The village is so postcard-pretty I can only imagine how fairytale-ish it must look covered in snow at winter. The tiny chapel across the Market Cross Monument has a confessional with ancient-looking embroidered knee pillows. We are told that some movies were shot here. Like “Warhorses”. But I’m more interested in Dr. Doolittle’s cottage near the church. One of these days, I’d be back here to try their walking trails into the woodlands. Cotswolds has a popular trail for hikers though I didn’t see anyone prepped for a hike. Rather, only tourists like me who were suddenly afflicted with camera-snapping fingers at every turn.

Cotswolds

Cotswolds

Cotswolds

Cotswolds

Oh, Castle Combe. You’re breathtakingly beautiful it aches to leave you! And no, we won’t forget that crackling and Yorkshire pudding we had for lunch at The Manor House. So British. Soooo good.

The Manor House

The Manor House

Crackling & Yorkshire pudding