It’s been over 400 years yet the fort in Galle still manages to enchant its visitors. The Portuguese started it (16th century) and the Dutch fortified it (17th century). The old town of Galle and its fortifications – more commonly called Galle Fort – lying on the southwestern coast of Sri Lanka, has been declared a UNESCO Heritage Site. The ramparts made of granite stones and corals are its biggest attraction, along with its lighthouse, which unfortunately had too many scaffoldings at the time we visited to render a good photo.

The old town within the walls has the charm of an old European village combined with East Asian architecture. One finds multi-religious and multi-ethnic influences with robed men roaming the streets and locals sneaking in and out of mosques and churches. The settlers include Portuguese, Dutch, British, Sinhalese and Moors. All these add character to the Old Town of Galle. I can spend an entire day here walking aimlessly — on ramparts and along the narrow alleys — sneaking in and out of museums, quaint restaurants, cafes, the art galleries, handicraft and gem stores. If only we had time 😔

(If i knew we’d have a lousy lunch, I could have skipped it and walked around town instead, maybe while licking an ice cream bar)

Photo Credit: Annabelle

The signages I found were enough to intrigue me about living here. I’ve read half the population are Moors. The mosque I passed walking towards the lighthouse is most charming in its all-white exterior. So are the structures in Mediterranean colors with interesting wood carvings all around town. So colorful, just like its history. I can only feel thankful that this town was restored and preserved even after it was badly hit by a tsunami on that Boxing Day in 2004.

Art and culture, as well as religious traditions, flourished here. Peaceful co-existence and harmony. I would love to stay a few days here. Perhaps meet anew that crazy jumper who poses for a buck. Free if you’re a young, charming lady. Ahem. Walking mindlessly, enjoying the seascape and the colonial houses with gables and verandahs. The streets have very curious names : Lighthouse, Church, Pedlar (peddler?), Hospital Streets. For sure, it would be very hard to get lost here. I even read that dining here can be a foodie’s adventure. (Not our luck) The mixed bag of hotels, coffee shops, jewelry stores, tea shops is an enchanting medley of European, Moorish and Asian influences. No wonder this town attracted many artists, photography buffs, designers and literary figures.

If Nuwara Eliya is Sri Lanka’s “Little England”, this must be their “Little Holland & Portugal”

We spent way too little time here, methinks. We’ve seen many monuments, the former moat surrounding the walks, the drawbridge, clock tower, Dutch Reformed Churches, and more bastions — on a bus. The bygone colonial era flashing across bus window panes in an area small enough to be walkable. 😭 A few likewise went for a stroll but had to head back to where we had our unforgettable lunch. Oh, Sri Lanka. I’m NOT done with you. Not just yet!

Not done! Not yet. 😭😭😭

No, he’s not one of the Crazy Jumpers. Just one photography nut. Can’t blame him. He’s married to one.