I would have wanted to end the series with the country’s cuisine but realized I don’t have enough photos to interest you. There’s the Monhinga which I had most breakfasts — a soupy noodle dish steeped in catfish broth. Yum. And of course, there’s the Myanmar and Mandalay beer, along with the full-bodied Shiraz and Cab Sauvignon wines from Red Mountain Estate, in the area of Lake Inle. I also tried some fried stuff, too oily for my liking, but I tried it anyway and “paid for it” with a bum stomach. So, cuidate!

 

 

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That is not to say you should avoid street food altogether. We liked some cracklings or “kropeck” and some local fruits while we were there. But if you go to the local market, you’d find lotsa stuff, mostly fried, and OILY. Some looked liked fried pancakes, others were simply fried/floured vegetable strips. If you grow tired of Myanmar cuisine, you’d also find many Thai restos around. We were also happy with our pizza and pasta lunch in Golden Kite Restaurant in Lake Inle area. Take your pick!

 

 

This was served to the monks. I was waiting for an invite but didn't get lucky😄

This was served to the monks. I was waiting for an invite but didn’t get lucky😄

 

 

Not food but they chew on it! Betel nuts and leaves, anyone? Photo Credit: Chikie

Not food but they chew on it! Betel nuts and leaves, anyone? Photo Credit: Chikie

 

 

Because they share borders with Thailand, Laos, India and Bangladesh, Myanmar cuisine was influenced by these neighboring countries’ dishes. Except for the Monhinga noodle soup, I can’t think of a distinctly Burmese dish now. The curry dishes remind me of either India or Thailand. But maybe, I wasn’t my usual adventurous self while I was here because of my bum stomach.😔

 

 

Went nuts over this local fruit. Photo Credit: Chikie

Went nuts over this local fruit. Photo Credit: Chikie

 

 

This is monhinga soup, made of rice noodles, fish broth and lotsa herbs and spices.

This is mohinga soup, made of rice noodles, fish broth and lotsa herbs and spices.

 

 

When in doubt though, go for the Monhinga soup. And then some fruits. Our guide said they grow very good rice in Myanmar. Records show that for a time, the country was a top rice exporter. Can’t complain. Especially over their fried rice with all sorts of veggie strips thrown in.

 

 

Not sure what they're selling. Venue: 5 day "moving market" in Lake Inle

Not sure what they’re selling. Venue: 5 day “moving market” in Lake Inle

 

 

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Street food is a-plenty. And very, very cheap. That’s good news for the budget travelers. If you want to be picky and play safe, just try the international (and “milder” versions of the local dishes) buffet in many of Myanmar’s hotels and big restaurants.

While shopping in Lake Inle, the vendors were having this for snacks. Ogled it for a long time and merited an invite. Got lucky this time 😄

While shopping in Lake Inle, the vendors were having this for snacks. Ogled it for a long time and merited an invite. Got lucky this time 😄

 

 

 

 

It's like the equivalent of vegetable tempura or kakiage, but tons oilier!

It’s like the equivalent of vegetable tempura or kakiage, but tons oilier!

 

 

Overall, my best gastronomic memory of Myanmar is really their……. WINES. Best surprise! At US$20-$27 a bottle of shiraz or cab, give it a go. It would have been interesting to see the vineyards of Red Mountain Estate. But the wines…. I’m really pleasantly surprised.

 

 

Taro leaf-wrapped and floating in oil!

Taro leaf-wrapped and floating in oil!

 

 

It's custard apple from Myanmar. Not as good as their Thai counterpart.

It’s custard apple from Myanmar. Not as good as their Thai counterpart.

 

 

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