Tag Archive: Bais



We hired a boat for whale and dolphin-watching and sailed out of Bais’ Capiñahan Wharf some 45 kilometers north of Dumaguete City. The plan is to have lunch in Manjuyod Sandbar but the boat captain dropped anchor only 15 minutes from the wharf so we can enjoy the sandbar before the tide rises later in the day.

 

 

 

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Capiñahan Wharf in Bais, Negros Oriental. About 45 kms north of Dumaguete City.

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The Sandbar belongs to Manjuyod town, near Bais.

 

 

We found the solar-powered cottages here looking like houses on stilts. The Manjuyod Sandbar stretches for 7 kilometers slicing the blue waters of South Bais Bay. Best during low tide, of course, as this piece of paradise is completely submerged when the tide rises. The first time we dropped anchor the water was knee-deep. Tempting to walk the whole stretch out of sheer curiosity but one never knows how fast the waters rise.

 

 

 

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Just 10-15 minutes from Capiñahan Wharf you’d spot these solar-powered cottages on stilts.

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Like huts floating on water during high tide. Cottages on stilts during low tide.

 

 

Right in the middle of the deep, blue sea. A perfect day to take a dip so long as one observes the “boundaries” left and right of the white sandbar. I can imagine myself setting up a table here with a bottle of wine and some pica-picas. But not today.

 

 

 

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Time your visit when tide is low to enjoy this fine white sandbar.

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Touchdown! Manjuyod Sandbar.

 

 

 

They say some dolphins can be seen this close to the sandbar. There were none. The boat crew said pods and pods of them can be found further along in Tañon Strait. We can wait. For the moment, we frolicked in the sandbar, spotted a starfish, careful to lift it for a closer look and dropping it right back into the water where it belongs.

 

 

 

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Stretching all of 7kms, Manjuyod Sandbar slices right in the middle of the South Bais Bay. Paradise Found!

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Sourced from the Net. A photo of the 7km. sandbar during low tide. Completely submerged when tide rises.

 

 

 

Just before sailing on towards the deeper section of Tañon Strait, we luckily spotted a fisherman with his singular heavy catch of the day. A GIANT SQUID! One can fit his whole arm inside it. How can you pass up this chance? We brought lunch but a grilled giant squid would be a great addition we can share with the boat crew. Everybody happy!

 

 

 

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Spotted a fisherman with his freshly-caught giant squid.

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I wonder how many kilos this giant squid weighed!

 

 

 

We returned to the sandbar for lunch. Happy to have the pleasure of meeting them dolphins in their natural playground. Lunch unpacked. Giant squid on the grill. We enjoyed our lunch even as it started to rain, wind growing stronger, tide rising. All’s well. We’re just 10-15 minutes from the wharf where our van is waiting to drive us back to Dumaguete City. Sandbar. Check. Dolphins. Check. Starfish. A bonus. Giant Squid. An even bigger bonus!

 

 

 

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Lunch! A giant squid off Bais Bay. Enjoyed, grilled, in Manjuyod Sandbar.

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You can’t do this just anywhere! Manjuyod Sandbar. Off Dumaguete City.

 

 

For the rest of our adventure on this day, check out my earlier blog on the Playful Dolphins of Bais / Tañon Strait. Happy travels, everyone.

Life is a celebration.


The gods smiled on us. After some rainshowers the first 2 days in Dumaguete, the bright sun and clear skies looked promising as we sailed from Bais wharf towards that area straddling between Cebu and Negros. Our boat — good for 15 pax — served all 4 of us well. We loved the “space”, allowing us to run up front, to the left or right sides of the boat, even to lie down on the long benches while the boat crew navigate along the Strait searching for pods of playful dolphins.

 

 

 

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Our boat sailed out of Bais Wharf, an hour’s drive north of Dumaguete City.

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If you’re lucky, you’d see dolphins near Manjuyod Sandbar just 10-15 minutes from the wharf.


 

The deep blue waters of Bais Bay and Tañon Strait is home to these intelligent mammals. I shrieked in delight as soon as I spotted some spinner dolphins playfully showing off from a distance. And these dolphins looked just as happy seeing us and swimming alongside our boat. Like children showing off their talents. Or like marine escorts leading us to more of their friends!

 

 

 

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Playful, Intelligent Mammals in their very playground!

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Dolphins, blue waters and blue-polished toenails 😉


 

None of us were fast enough to take a decent shot of those dolphins jumping up and out of the water. But it was still an awesome (pardon the overused word) animal adventure for us. Mimicking dolphin sounds, we enjoyed schools of them in the calm waters of the bay and further along Tañon Strait. Surely, this is their playground!

 

 

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What a show off!

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Swimming alongside of our boat, like marine escorts!

 

 

The strait spans 5 kilometers to as wide as 27 kilometers between Negros Oriental and Cebu provinces. But it was in the deep, wide sections of the Strait where we found more dolphins. No luck with the pygmy sperm whales, but the many show-off dolphins made up for the whales’ absence. What a thrill!

 

 

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Glistening in the blue waters of Tañon Strait.

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Up front, left and right of the boat. They’re everywhere!

 

 

Travel Tips: Go early and catch them dolphins during their feeding time. From Dumaguete, we drove less than an hour to Bais and took a boat. If the tide’s low, best to stop by Manjuyod Sandbar just 10-15 minutes boat ride from the wharf. If you’re lucky, you can already spot some dolphins here. Further on, you’d be literally surrounded by these far-from-shy creatures. As happy as can be. Them and you. Surely, Negros is so blessed with nature’s bounty!

 

 

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Dolphins in the wilds. Far from shy.